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Guide to the Edmund G. Smith diary
1942-1943

Collection number: HMC-0573.
Creator: Smith, Edmund G.
Title: Edmund G. Smith diary.
Dates: 1942-1943.
Volume of collection: 0.02 cubic feet. 
Language of materials: Collection materials in English.
Collection summary: Diary of a soldier stationed at Fort Greely.

Biographical note:
Edmund G. Smith was born in Nova, Ohio in 1918. He worked for Cleveland Diesel Engine, part of the General Motors Corporation, in Bay City, Ohio, before enlisting in the U. S. Army in October 1941. He was then sent to Port Hayes and Camp Walters, Texas, for training. In January 1942, Smith was ordered to Fort Lawton, Washington, before assignment to Fort Greely, Kodiak, Alaska, in March 1942. Smith served in Company E, 201st Infantry, until April 1943, when he was transferred to the 799th Engineers Forestry Company, also in Kodiak.

Collection description:
This collection consists of a diary written by Private First Class, Edmund G. Smith while he was stationed at Fort Greely, Alaska. The diary contains sixty-three pages of handwritten notes concerning his life in the service. Included in the diary are dated entries from October 1942 through December 1943, describing his duties, camp conditions, off duty activities, war rumors, and the weather. Other entries include personal and biographical information, names of fellow soldiers, and lists of letters and gifts received.

Arrangement: The diary entries are in chronological order.

Digitized copies: Digital copies of collection material not available online. For information about obtaining digital copies, please contact Archives and Special Collections.

Rights note: Archives & Special Collections does not hold copyright to this item.

Preferred citation: Edmund G. Smith diary, Archives and Special Collections, Consortium Library, University of Alaska Anchorage.

Acquisition note: This collection was purchased at internet auction by the Archives in 2002.

Processing information: This collection was described by Kathleen Hertel in 2002.